Read and annotate “A Formula for Happiness” (Links to an external site.) by Arth

Read and annotate “A Formula for Happiness” (Links to an external site.) by Arthur C. Brooks. While annotating, include the following: text marking, response, summary, and definition.If you have trouble reading the article, do a Google search for the author and title in a different browser. (For instance, switch from Chrome to Safari.)
You can also listen to the article here (Links to an external site.).
Take a picture or scan of two pages from the article with your annotations. (Copy and paste the article on a Word Doc, Do the annotations there. And send as is.)
Summarize the entire article in 6-8 sentences. Include only the main points. Do not quote anything, and use all your own words. Include a signal phrase at the beginning with writer and article title
Paraphrase the paragraph that starts at the bottom of page 6, beginning, “But today. . .” Include all details of the paragraph, about same length as paragraph. Do not quote anything, and use all your own words. Include a signal phrase at the beginning with writer and article title. Paraphrase can be difficult. Do your best. The first sentence of this paragraph refers to our right to pursue happiness. It is fine to mention what the pronoun “this” refers to. In terms of the actual paraphrasing, do a close reading of the paragraph first and take some notes. What exactly is it saying? What are all the points it is making in terms of those statistics? The first step is to completely understand it. The next step is to then translate it into your words/style of writing.
Review the Making Sandwiches page in the Week 2 module, then create a quotation Big Mac using two quotations of your choice from “A Formula for Happiness.” Include the following in your Big Mac: bread, signal phrases, transitions, introductions to quotations, and analysis. (Top bread would be A signal phrase giving the name of the author and publication. Sometimes you don’t have all of this information, so just include what you can. Also, you want to give any relevant information about the author or source that makes it seem reputable to support your point. For instance, if the writer is a doctor, it might be helpful to mention that. ) The middle would be This is what goes in between the two pieces of bread. In our case, it is your source material. Here you will either quote, summarize or paraphrase. Be sure that, before you switch from the source material to your ideas again, you add an in-text citation. Keep the meat thin and manageable, so you can analyze it completely. Also, if it is more than four lines, use block quotation format. The bottom would be Just like the top piece of bread, this part is also in your own words and uses your own ideas. There are a few different strategies for this section of the sandwich. You may use them alone or in combination, depending on the purpose of your paragraph: Analyze what the writer means (break it down for the reader) Make connections or contrasts between this thought and other ideas. You do not need in-text (parenthetical) citations for this assignment, as there are no page numbers for an online article. The signal phrases will count for the citation.
Requirements: As long as what it says on top

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